Photographic Styles on iPhone 13: what are they and how to use them?


All iPhone 13 models introduce a new camera feature that Apple calls Photographic Styles, and which — briefly explained — is like traditional photo filters, but better. 

Photographic Styles can be selected either via the camera app, or can be applied later to any photo (captured not just on iPhone 13, but also on any other device). They are customizable too, so you aren’t limited to just one look.

But first, let us demonstrate where you can find them:

1. Open the Camera app on your iPhone 13 series device

2. While in Photo mode, tap on the arrow at the top of the camera

3. Tap the Photographic Styles icon to enable it

4. Swipe between the 4 different Styles and customize them to your liking

5. Press the shutter button to capture the photo! Simple as that!

There are four Photographic Styles that Apple provides:

  • Rich Contrast
  • Vibrant
  • Warm
  • Cool

We’ll show you specific examples of each style as soon as we get a hold of the new iPhone 13 models.

How are the new Photographic Styles different from regular filters?

Traditional photo filters apply a look to the whole photo, making it more or less contrasted, warmer or colder, etc. Photographic Styles, on the other hand, allows you to change the warmth of a photo without this affecting skin tones, for example. Photographic Styles also come with separate Tone and Warmth controls that are not available on traditional photo filters.

What do Photographic Styles Tone and Warmth controls do?

You have two controls for every Photographic Style: Tone and Warmth.

Bringing the tone up, makes a photo brighter and more vivid, while bringing it down increases the contrast and adds more shadows.

Bringing the warmth up, enhances golden tonalities in a photo, while bringing it down actually enhances blue tonalities.

The changes will also be saved and can be reused later on, so that you can easily take every photo with your personal style.

What do you think about the new Photographic Styles feature? Do you think it will change the way you take photographs and do you plan on using it often, or would you instead just use the auto settings?



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